Thoughts & Notes

Life isn't about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself.

fastcompany:

The fastest-growing demographic in the workforce knows a few things about motivating and leading others.
With their widespread entrance into the workplace, millennials are bringing new requirements of employee engagement that include creativity, entrepreneurialism, and accelerated career growth. Research by Deloitte is projecting that millennials will make up 75% of the global workforce by 2025. They are supportive of—and engaged with—companies that care about more than a high-profit margin.
Leaders are noticing the change. According to Deloitte, 78% of business leaders rate retention and engagement as urgent or important.
What secrets of employee engagement can you pick up from millennials? It’s not about pay or work-life balance. Here are some ways to increase engagement in your organization:
Read More>

fastcompany:

The fastest-growing demographic in the workforce knows a few things about motivating and leading others.

With their widespread entrance into the workplace, millennials are bringing new requirements of employee engagement that include creativity, entrepreneurialism, and accelerated career growth. Research by Deloitte is projecting that millennials will make up 75% of the global workforce by 2025. They are supportive of—and engaged with—companies that care about more than a high-profit margin.

Leaders are noticing the change. According to Deloitte, 78% of business leaders rate retention and engagement as urgent or important.

What secrets of employee engagement can you pick up from millennials? It’s not about pay or work-life balance. Here are some ways to increase engagement in your organization:

Read More>

Reblogué depuis Fast Company

fastcompany:

How taking monotasking to an extreme can help you tackle ambitious projects.
Every March, Randi Zuckerberg goes on a spring break. Last year she went to New York; the year before she went to Tokyo. But unlike your standard vacation, Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Zuckerberg Media (and sister of Facebook CEO Mark), spends little time relaxing. Instead, she uses the time to focus exclusively and intensely on one project. This year she spent the month of March on Broadway, performing in Rock of Ages. In Tokyo, she holed up with her family to work on her book Dot Complicated.

"I understand this is not realistic for everyone to do," the former Facebooker told Fast Company. “I call it my deep-dive creative month.”
The idea, she says, came from Facebook’s hackathons, marathon coding events where engineers work on crazy ideas and passion projects. “There is something about that intense focus,” she said. “When you sit someone down and say you have 12 hours to crank something out, you see these amazing projects.” Her March deep dive takes that general principle and explodes it into a month-long work-a-thon.
Read More>

fastcompany:

How taking monotasking to an extreme can help you tackle ambitious projects.

Every March, Randi Zuckerberg goes on a spring break. Last year she went to New York; the year before she went to Tokyo. But unlike your standard vacation, Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Zuckerberg Media (and sister of Facebook CEO Mark), spends little time relaxing. Instead, she uses the time to focus exclusively and intensely on one project. This year she spent the month of March on Broadway, performing in Rock of Ages. In Tokyo, she holed up with her family to work on her book Dot Complicated.

image

"I understand this is not realistic for everyone to do," the former Facebooker told Fast Company. “I call it my deep-dive creative month.”

The idea, she says, came from Facebook’s hackathons, marathon coding events where engineers work on crazy ideas and passion projects. “There is something about that intense focus,” she said. “When you sit someone down and say you have 12 hours to crank something out, you see these amazing projects.” Her March deep dive takes that general principle and explodes it into a month-long work-a-thon.

Read More>

Reblogué depuis Fast Company

fastcompany:

Do your Internet habits hold you back, or help you succeed?
In theory, technology should increase both work flexibility and productivity, but it is also responsible for procrastination and a major threat to people’s work-life balance.
In fact, much of the recent debate about work-life imbalance is concerned with our relationship with technology, in particular our inability to disconnect or go offline.
For example, in the U.S. almost 50% of working adults report being “hooked” on email, which is estimated to cost the nation’s economy at least $900 billion a year in productivity loss. According to consulting firm McKinsey & Company, professionals spend 28% of their work time reading or answering emails. These statistics explain the international success of bestselling books like The Four Hour Work Week.
Furthermore, even people who manage to keep their email addiction in check are prone to getting hooked on other sites or apps, such as Facebook or Twitter, with a growing number of people trying social media sabbatical, where they detox from these sites for a couple of months or so. Needless to say, our digital excesses may harm not just our productivity but also our personal relationships with others, especially if they demand exclusive attention from the physical world.
So how can we better manage our web-life balance? Here are four practical suggestions you may want to consider:
Read More>

fastcompany:

Do your Internet habits hold you back, or help you succeed?

In theory, technology should increase both work flexibility and productivity, but it is also responsible for procrastination and a major threat to people’s work-life balance.

In fact, much of the recent debate about work-life imbalance is concerned with our relationship with technology, in particular our inability to disconnect or go offline.

For example, in the U.S. almost 50% of working adults report being “hooked” on email, which is estimated to cost the nation’s economy at least $900 billion a year in productivity loss. According to consulting firm McKinsey & Company, professionals spend 28% of their work time reading or answering emails. These statistics explain the international success of bestselling books like The Four Hour Work Week.

Furthermore, even people who manage to keep their email addiction in check are prone to getting hooked on other sites or apps, such as Facebook or Twitter, with a growing number of people trying social media sabbatical, where they detox from these sites for a couple of months or so. Needless to say, our digital excesses may harm not just our productivity but also our personal relationships with others, especially if they demand exclusive attention from the physical world.

So how can we better manage our web-life balance? Here are four practical suggestions you may want to consider:

Read More>

Reblogué depuis Fast Company

fastcompany:

You can unplug the Internet and pull the shades—or you can phone a friend.
You’re reaching the frayed ends of over-caffeinated overtime and if your inbox pings one more time, you might throw your laptop at a wall. If you had the time to read a whole self-help book on being overwhelmed, well, you wouldn’t need it, would you?
A study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology looks at your options for bailing out of a burnout, before the meltdown starts.
Using a psychology model of coping mechanisms called selection, optimization, and compensation, the researchers tested each method with a sample of 294 employees and their supervisors. Only one of these strategies actually worked. But first, a review of their definitions:
Read More>

fastcompany:

You can unplug the Internet and pull the shades—or you can phone a friend.

You’re reaching the frayed ends of over-caffeinated overtime and if your inbox pings one more time, you might throw your laptop at a wall. If you had the time to read a whole self-help book on being overwhelmed, well, you wouldn’t need it, would you?

study published in the Journal of Occupational Health Psychology looks at your options for bailing out of a burnout, before the meltdown starts.

Using a psychology model of coping mechanisms called selection, optimization, and compensation, the researchers tested each method with a sample of 294 employees and their supervisors. Only one of these strategies actually worked. But first, a review of their definitions:

Read More>

Reblogué depuis Fast Company

fastcompany:

Careful listening, collaboration, asking good questions—these “soft skills” aren’t always taught in school.
Today’s college graduates need every skill-related edge they can get when it comes to applying for and landing a full-time job.
Numerous surveys and reports indicate that recent U.S. college graduates face a wildly competitive job market along with astronomical student loan debt. More than 40% of recent graduates are underemployed and 16% are working part-time jobs, according to Accenture’s 2013 College Graduate Employment Survey.
One employer survey, conducted by staffing company Adecco, indicates that 44% of responding companies cited “soft skills, such as communication, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration” as the area with “the biggest gap.”
Additionally, a Talent Shortage Survey from ManpowerGroup discovered that nearly one in five employers worldwide is unable to fill positions because they can’t find people with soft skills.
So what are these soft skills—and other critical workplace skills—that are necessary to join today’s collaborative, fast-moving, real-time workforce? Here are five:
Read More>

fastcompany:

Careful listening, collaboration, asking good questions—these “soft skills” aren’t always taught in school.

Today’s college graduates need every skill-related edge they can get when it comes to applying for and landing a full-time job.

Numerous surveys and reports indicate that recent U.S. college graduates face a wildly competitive job market along with astronomical student loan debt. More than 40% of recent graduates are underemployed and 16% are working part-time jobs, according to Accenture’s 2013 College Graduate Employment Survey.

One employer survey, conducted by staffing company Adecco, indicates that 44% of responding companies cited “soft skills, such as communication, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration” as the area with “the biggest gap.”

Additionally, a Talent Shortage Survey from ManpowerGroup discovered that nearly one in five employers worldwide is unable to fill positions because they can’t find people with soft skills.

So what are these soft skills—and other critical workplace skills—that are necessary to join today’s collaborative, fast-moving, real-time workforce? Here are five:

Read More>

Reblogué depuis Fast Company

typostrate:

Typostrate Weekend Inspiration 57

Typography could be sometimes a thin line between love and hate. But sometimes it is also not my circus and not my monkeys what others think and say about it. Be patient and watch something beautiful. Therefor we found for you some amazing inspirations this week. Enjoy them!

It’s not what you look at that matters, it’s what you see.” Henry David Thoreau

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Reblogué depuis typostrate